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Lee Friedlander

Text from Wikipedia

Friedlander, Lee
American, 1934-

Lee Friedlander (b. 1934 in Aberdeen, Washington) is an influential American photographer and artist.

Friedlander's early work is known for his self-exploration evidenced in his self-portraits and for his cultural statements, such as can be seen in his photographs of the influence of television. Lee also is a Jazz aficionado and did a series of portraits of Jazz musicians. He was a key figure in the 1967 New Documents exhibition, at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. The New Documents exhibition also featured Garry Winogrand and Diane Arbus.

Over the years Friedlander's style has changed. Images from a period of 15 years across America show his internalization in particular of Eugène Atget, Robert Frank, and Walker Evans. His photographs reflect the knowledge of what came before but the images are entirely different. His use of fences to frame images of structures is reminiscent of what came before, but not at all like them. His late work reveals a more luminescent image. While suffering from arthritis he was housebound and like many other artists and photographers made use of what was around him. He published a text called Stems before having his knee joints replaced since his "limbs" reminded him of stems. These images display the impact of texture which was not a feature of his older work. The images also remind one of Josef Sudek, who also did much photography from within the confines of his home and studio. Friedlander feels that his texts are even more important to his body of work than are his exhibitions. The photographs can all be seen in close proximity and one after another.

He shot primarily with a Leica M series 35mm camera until the early 1990's at which point he switched to a medium format Hasselblad Superwide.

In 2005 Friedlander was the subject of a major retrospective with a corresponding catalog at the Museum of Modern Art. In the same year he was the recipient of the 2005 Hasselblad International Award.

Friedlander is represented in New York by Janet Borden, Inc. and in San Francisco by Fraenkel Gallery.


 

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